Survival

Wintertime Survival: Learn How Our Ancestors Survived The Cold Season

When winter comes everyone must be equipped with wintertime survival skills. If you find yourself struggling now, can you imagine how our ancestors survived? Read on and find out how our ancestors survived the dreaded cold season.

7 Items Our Ancestors Have For Winter Survival

You may have wondered how our ancestors survived winter without power and other modern technologies that are providing us all the comfort today. Let’s go back to the time when people had to come up with creative methods to stay warm and let the cold season pass by just like any other regular season does.

Basically, just like any preppers of today’s generation, they prepared before wintertime arrived. But unlike, today’s prepper who can easily come up with their essentials for a short period of time, our ancestors spent most of the warmer months of the preparations for the winter season.A Let’s look at 7 survival items our ancestors find absolutely necessary for wintertime survival.

I would say these are still essential today despite all the advances in technology we have at present.

1. Food

Food
image via homesteading

Food is the most important thing to have when it comes to survival. This would mean that during dry season our ancestors have already done their drying, and smoking process to conserve food for wintertime months. Here in my homestead, Iam doing all 2 preservation methods including canningA for my produce for later utilize or to give them a longer shelf life. If youare not in a homestead setting, processed food are readily available in groceries and supermarkets.

2. Firewood

Firewood
image via homesteading

FirewoodsA are essential not only in keeping the family warm but also in cook. Cutting wood is a lot harder during winter season than during summer time. So our ancestors would take advantage of the dry season to stack firewood for wintertime. Even these days this practice is still applicable , no one would dare to go out and collect firewood when itas already snowing outside.

3. Medicines

Medicines
image via homesteading

These are not the ones brought in pharmacies, these are homemade remedies. Herbs infusion, extracts and other natural remedies nature provides. For todayas generation, homemade redress may only be seen and commonly used in a homestead define, just like ours, but if you ask me I truly find homemade remedies more helpful in preventing illness( don’t take my term for it, though, I’m no expert ). Except for terminal illness, those really involve expert medical attention.

4. A Blankets

Blankets
image credits in homesteading article

Keeping your home warm was then a challenge, particularly a bigger home with plenty of rooms. Few really could afford a fireplace in each room, even if they needed one. So theyad warm the primary living area of the house leaving each doorway to the bedroom open. Whatever warmth managed to get inside any bedroom that’s all they’d get.

The other thing they have are a pile of blankets. It was a common scene in every home to have a chest at the foot of the bed containing a heap of blankets stored during warmer weather that’s very much useful when winter comes. Even today, I’ve got a pile of extra blankets here in my homestead, and I’m looking forward to adding to it year after year. Inducing DIY warm wintertime blankets have in fact become one of my favorite pass time during winter months.

5. Candles

Candles
image via homesteading

Making candles was a summertime task. They had to attain them when the bees were dynamic, assembling pollen and creating honey. It simply means they constructed them during the dryer months of which there were plenty of blooms on the trees and in the fields. During winter, bees maintained themselves hidden in their hives, living off the honey they made up in summer.

Collecting honey during summer is similarly collecting the beeswax. Collecting beeswax simply means itas already time to make candles. I enjoy stimulating my own candles and yes, I also have beeswax, so constructing candles here in my homestead is pretty easy.

During winter, bees maintain themselves hidden in their hives, living off the honey they made up in summer. Collecting honey during summertime is similarly collecting the beeswax. Collecting beeswax simply means itas already time to build candles.A I enjoy attaining my own candles and yes, I also have beeswax, so attaining candles here in my homestead is pretty easy.

6. Bed Warmers

Bed

Warming up the bed, before sleeping at night was always a smart thing to do. This was made possible by a bed warmer. To our ancestors, these are metal or copper-covered skillets with long handles. The receptacle was loaded with boulders that had been warmed at the leading edge of the fire and afterward slid between layers of sheet material utilizing the long manage. This would warm the bed adequately.

7. Tools

Tools
image via homesteading

Common tools our ancestors have were from blacksmithing. Iron and steel were forged together in the extreme heat. If you want to learn this skill you must know what youare doing and always start with the basic of blacksmithing. Blacksmithing can be an amazing hobby and an important survival skill too.

Want to learn how to survive and thrive use the old ways of the Pioneer? Check out this video from My Home and Garden :

Our ancestors definitely have their own style of survival and we wouldnat be here if they didnat make it! These 7 items are pretty basic that even me here in my homestead always have a stockpile of these no matter what the climate is.

What winter survival items do you stockpile in your homestead? Let us know in the comments below ? Need assistance on how to make your homestead thrive during winter? Check out The Ultimate Winter Survival Skills For The Homestead !

Featured Image Via Pimeruum

The post Winter Survival: Learn How Our Ancestors Survived The Cold Season appeared first on Homesteading Simple Self Sufficient Off-The-Grid | Homesteading.com.

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